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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Browse the editorial styleguide A–Z

R&D
Use when referring to research and development work, departments, or efforts; no space before or after the ampersand.
Rathskeller
note the -er ending; its nicknames are the Rath and the Rat
re
Most compound words using this prefix do not take a hyphen; with some, however, a hyphen is added to indicate that something is happening again: recover (to improve) vs. re-cover (cover again), recreate (to enjoy leisure) vs. re-create (to create again); the admissions office uses re-entry student; see also prefixes
recommended references
The Chicago Manual of Style. 16th ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2010. The Associated Press Stylebook, 2014. Merriam–Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed., Springfield, Mass.: Merriam–Webster, 2003. Strunk, William, Jr., and E.B. White. The Elements of Style, 4th ed., Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2000.
recreate; re-create
These are two different words.
Red Shirt, The™
see The Red Shirt
regent, regents
lowercase when referring to one regent or such a group generically; uppercase when using the full, formal name of UW–Madison’s group: the UW System Board of Regents; see also board of directors, board of regents, board of visitors and UW System Board of Regents
registered marks, trademarks
do not use ™ or ® in journalistic text, but they are used with, e.g., The Red Shirt™, the Wisconsin Alumni Association®, and BADGER HUDDLE®; see also CMS 8.152
registrar
Office of the Registrar, registrar’s office
representative (in Congress)
see CMS 8.21
Republican
see CMS 8.65
research and development
see R&D
ResNet
the Residential Network; managed by the Division of University Housing’s Information Technology Department
rock ’n’ roll
Use apostrophes around n.
rowing team
see crew and teams
RSVP
French for Répondez, s’il vous plait, which means Please respond; using please with the phrase is redundant because the SVP portion already says that; do not use it as a noun; Please reply, Please respond, or Please register are good substitutes